20 Impressive Australian Homes That Bring the Outdoors In


These sun-filled dwellings blur the boundaries between the interior spaces and their surroundings.

From Perth to Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, and beyond, these Aussie residences demonstrate what it means to optimize a home for indoor/outdoor living.

A Multitiered Addition With a Lush Courtyard Revives a Federation-Style Melbourne Home

<span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">Architectural studio WALA revived a Federation-era bungalow in Melbourne with a two-level extension that incorporates a rear garden and addresses the home’s flood-prone site. At the rear of the home, full-height, sliding glass doors open to a raised deck that connects to a self-contained pavilion with a study and second living room. The large, rear courtyard is anchored by a Japanese maple tree that works to harmonize the old and new buildings.</span>

Melbourne architectural studio WALA revived a Federation-era bungalow with a two-level extension that incorporates a rear garden and addresses the home’s flood-prone site. At the rear of the structure, full-height, sliding glass doors open to a raised deck that connects to a self-contained pavilion with a study and second living room. The large, rear courtyard is anchored by a Japanese maple tree that works to harmonize the old and new buildings.

Photo: Tess Kelly

Developed as a holiday home, the pared-back timber construction is a nod to the modest fisher-cottages prevalent in the area.

At the edge of Royal National Park in the beachside hamlet of Bundeena, architect Hannah Tribe designed her family’s 540-square-foot holiday home using prefab technologies. The minimalist, timber-clad exterior nods to local vernacular, keeping with fishing cottages prevalent in the region that stand in large gardens with their rectilinear forms. Passive heating and cooling are achieved through the thermal mass of the concrete slab that supports the modular frame—and by siting the house to allow breezes to flow through its floor-to-ceiling sliders.

Photo by Katherine Lu

The large sliding doors are a telescoping design, which means they fit into one another and can therefore maximize the opening to the yard.

A Melbourne family with three young sons called upon local practice Mitsuori Architects to expand their venerable Victorian home with a two-level rear addition. On the ground level, a spacious living, dining, and kitchen area opens to the patio and backyard through large sliding glass doors that feature a telescoping design, which means they fit into one another and can therefore maximize the opening to the outdoor space.

Photo: Michael Kai

See the full story on Dwell.com: 20 Impressive Australian Homes That Bring the Outdoors In



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